San Diego Whale Watching

WHALE WATCHING SEASON IN SAN DIEGO RUNS FROM MID-DECEMBER THROUGH APRIL, AND MIGRATING GRAY WHALES ARE THE MOST COMMON SPECIES. TO SEE FEMALES WITH THEIR CALVES, GO LATE IN THE SEASON AS THEY TAKE THEIR BABIES BACK NORTH WITH THEM.

San Diego Whale Watching

Witness the Annual Winter Journey Each winter, the Pacific gray whales pass by the western overlooks of San Diego. After spending the summer feeding in the food-rich waters of the Arctic, the whales swim south along the coast to the bays of Baja California, where they mate and nurse their young. Along the way, they pass Point Loma and Cabrillo National Monument, where you can witness their annual winter journey.

Whale watching season in San Diego runs from mid-December through April, and migrating gray whales are the most common species. To see females with their calves, go late in the season as they take their babies back north with them.

We are in the throes of the perfect time to go whale watching in San Diego! Every winter, more than 20,000 Pacific gray whales travel 10,000 miles round-trip (the longest migration of any mammal on earth) from Alaska to the lagoons of Baja California. That makes San Diego, with its 78 miles of coastline directly in the migration path, the perfect place to watch.

To find out what all those wonderful creatures look like up close (and what they look like when you see them from a whale watching boat).

San Diego a good place see ocean-faring mammals at their finest. In fact, during whale watching season in San Diego, you’ll find plenty of ways to see the migration.

With a large kelp forest just offshore that attracts the ocean-going mammals, whale watchers don’t have to go far. Most whale watch trips around San Diego are reasonably short, and some companies guarantee that you can go again for free if you don’t see any whales.